Dialectic Level Courses

Students at the dialectic level are required to take the full core including history. literature, writing, logic, and Latin. 

Please note that not every class is offered every year.  Check the schedule for specific course offerings for that year.
Please note that a minimum of three students is required for a class to be held. If enough students enroll by July 1st the class will be held. Maximum class size is determined by space but normally will not exceed twelve students.

For tuition information, please see our tuition page

Dialectic Core Courses:

  • History Transitions: History and Literature Survey  

This is a prep course for those students transitioning between the Grammar and Dialectic levels. Students will read works from a variety of literary genres spanning the whole of Western Civilization to prepare them for the regular Western Civilization courses ahead of them in the Dialectic and Rhetoric courses. Prospective students should have competent reading and writing skills and be ready to begin working independently. Parents should be prepared to work with their student to develop good study habits and time management skills. 

Prerequisites:  Students should be 6th/7th grade and 12 yrs age by September 1st. Younger students should enroll in a Grammar level course or contact us to discuss placement. Students should have good independent reading skills and be able to write a five paragraph essay. Students must concurrently enroll in Classical Writing, Art of Argument and a Latin course.
Class meets: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
Home study expectations: A minimum of 6 hours per week outside of class.

  • Omnibus 1: Antiquity  

At the Dialectic level students are introduced to the great works of Western Civilization in this entry level course. Students will learn to read closely, study effectively and discuss intelligently the greatest works of this era as we take each thought captive to Christ.  Prospective students should have an enthusiasm for rigorous work, be able to work independently, and be able to manage their time well.  Parents of prospective students should be willing to conduct specific Bible studies from the text at home and work with their student to develop good daily study habits.

Nota Bene Interacting with the great works of Western Civilization requires a certain amount of maturity in the student. While we feel that the texts selected are appropriate for students at the 7th grade level, all students are different and, ultimately, it is the parents' responsibility to determine if a student is ready. We strongly recommend that students be 13 yrs of age by September 1st. Please review the book list prior to enrolling your student and contact us if you have any questions.       

Prerequisites:  As mentioned above, students should be 13 years of age by September 1st. Younger students should enroll in the Transitions course listed above.  Students should be able to read closely, outline their reading, and take notes for both their reading and lectures. Students must concurrently enroll in Classical Writing, Art of Argument and a Latin course.
Class meets:  Monday and Wednesday
Home study expectations: A minimum of 6 additional hours per week outside of class. 
High School credit (for 9th grade and above): 1 history, 1 literature 

  • Omnibus 2: Medieval Era through the Reformation  

Students in this second of the three year Dialectic level course will continue their studies of the great works of the Medieval, Renaissance and Reformation eras.  Students will continue to learn to read closely, discuss intelligently, and write cogently about their studies. The focus will be on grasping a good understanding of the timeline of Western Civilization, and evaluating the ideas that have shaped it. Families should engage in a thorough Bible study at home to prepare the student to evaluate their readings, and parents should work with their student to develop good time management and study skills.

Nota Bene:  Interacting with the great works of Western Civilization requires a certain amount of maturity in the student. While we feel that the texts selected are appropriate for students at the 7th grade level, all students are different and, ultimately, it is the parents' responsibility to determine if a student is ready. We strongly recommend that students be 13 yrs of age by September 1st. Please review the book list prior to enrolling your student and contact us if you have any questions.

Prerequisites: This course is open to students 7th grade and up, provided they are 13 years old by September 1st. Students should be able to read closely, outline their reading, and take notes for both their reading and lectures. Students must concurrently enroll in Classical Writing, Logic and a Latin course.
Class meets: Wednesday and Friday
Home study expectations: A minimum of 6 additional hours per week outside of class.
High School credit 
(for 9th grade and above): 1 history, 1 literature

  • Omnibus 3: Enlightenment through Modernity  (not offered 2017-18)

Students in this third of the three Dialectic level courses will continue their studies of the great works of the modern West.  Students will examine the modern world but with particular focus on its most influential development, America. Students will have the option to complete an independent but monitored study of American Government.

Nota Bene:  Interacting with the great works of Western Civilization requires a certain amount of maturity in the student. While we feel that the texts selected are appropriate for students at the 7th grade level, all students are different and, ultimately, it is the parents' responsibility to determine if a student is ready. We strongly recommend that students be 13 yrs of age by September 1st.

Please review the book list prior to enrolling your student and contact us if you have any questions.

Prerequisites:  Students must be at least 9th grade.  Students must concurrently enroll in Classical Writing, Logic and a Latin course.
Class meets: Wednesday and Friday
Home study expectations: A minimum of 6 additional hours per week outside of class. (More if choose the American Government option)
High School credit 
(for 9th grade and above): 1 history, 1 literature, optional 1 American Government

  • Classical Writing: Intermediate 

This course continues on the skills learned at the grammar level in composition.  Using the ancient progymnasmata or preliminary exercises, students develop further dexterity with the written word through analysis and imitation of excellent models.

Prerequisites: At a minimum, students should be competent in writing a five-paragraph essay, punctuate a simple sentence, and identify the function of each word in a sentence.  A sample of a student's writing may be requested if satisfaction of the prerequisite is in question.
Class meets: Monday
Home study expectations: A minimum of 3 additional hours per week outside of class.
High School credit 
(for 9th grade and above): 1 English composition credit

  • Classical Writing: Advanced Level 1

This composition course tackles the three universal problems every writer faces:  finding good ideas, organizing those ideas, and then stating those ideas well.  Students learn two styles of essay writing: the complete persuasive essay and the complete comparative essay.  More than writing, however, students learn the tools necessary to think deeply about any issue in any subject.  The skills acquired can be used across the curriculum and will be useful for a lifetime, but are especially good preparation for anyone interested in preparation for debate. A book list is available upon request.

Prerequisites:  This course is required for all students taking Omnibus 2.  Since the writing will be coordinated with the reading in Omnibus 2, any student who enrolls that is not taking Omnibus 2 must commit to reading those texts along with us. New students must demonstrate competency in basic five paragraph essay writing, as well as competent punctuation, spelling, and grammar skills. A sample of a student's work may be submitted to demonstrate fulfillment of the prerequisite. 

Class meets: Monday
Home study expectations: Approximately 3 hours per week.
High School credit 
(for 9th grade and above): 1 English composition credit 
Textbook

  • Latin 1

This course can either be a more rigorous continuation of the Latin for Children series, or a first course in classical language study for the dialectic level or older student. Latin history, myth and language acquisition are the focus as students master the first four conjugations of verbs and five declensions of nouns.

Prerequisite: Basic understanding of the parts of speech is necessary.  
Class meets:  Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
Home study expectations: 3-4 hours per week with parent
High School credit 
(for 9th grade and above): 1 foreign language credit
Textbook

  • Latin 2

This is the second half of a two year sequence in Latin.  See the description above for detail and for all the reasons to take Latin, please refer to our Core description.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin Alive 1 or instructor permission
Class meets: 
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
Home study expectations:  3-4 hours per week with parent
High School credit 
(for 9th grade and above): 1 foreign language credit
Textbook

  • Art of Argument

Logic is at the heart of classical Christian dialectic studies and this first logic course gives students a great start by focusing on informal fallacies and faulty reasoning. Skill in logic is an essential tool to equip students to analyze the world views around them and to hone their own communication skills.

Class meets: Wednesday
Home study expectations: 2-3 hours per week 
High School credit 
(for 9th grade and above): 1 credit humanities elective
Textbook

  • Traditional Logic 1 

This course is an introduction to formal logic, dealing with the form or structure of arguments, and an in-depth study of the categorical syllogism. It covers the theory of knowledge, logical statements, equivalent propositions, and the validity of syllogisms.

Prerequisite: Although there are no prerequisites for this course, it is recommended that the student be working at least at the Algebra I level in math. 
Class meet: Monday 
Home study expectations: 2-3 hours per week
High School credit 
(for 9th grade and above):  .5 credit humanities elective
Textbook: Memoria Press Traditional Logic I: An Introduction to Formal Logic

  • Traditional Logic 2  

In this course students continue their study of formal logic by examining the valid forms of categorical and conditional syllogisms, polysyllogisms, sorites, epicheirema, dilemmas and oblique syllogisms.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Traditional Logic 1 
Class meets: Monday
Home study expectations: 2-3 hours per week
High School credit 
(for 9th grade and above): .5 credit humanities elective
Textbook: Memoria Press Traditional Logic II: Advanced Formal Logic


Study Hall:  Remember to sign up for study hall for any break between classes.


Dialectic Level Electives for Core Students

(These courses are open to dialectic level students in addition to their Core Studies.)

  • Pre-Algebra

This course covers the advanced concepts necessary for success in higher level math classes. Students will be exposed to beginning algebraic equations and will review the essential computation skills needed for success.

Prerequisite: Entrance exam required.
Class meets: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday

  • Algebra 1

This course covers the beginning lessons in Algebra. Students will master linear and quadratic equations, simultaneous equations, and similar concepts.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Algebra at Collegium or entrance exam. Students must be at least 8th grade. 
Class meets: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
Home study expectations: 3-4 hours per week
High School credit 
(for 9th grade and above): 1 math credit

  • General Science 

This course covers such topics as the scientific method, designing experiments, simple machine, archaeology, geology, paleontology, biology, and human anatomy and physiology. Numerous in-class labs and investigations provide opportunities for students to develop and practice laboratory skills. 
Class meets: tbd
 
Home study cxpectations: 3-4 hours per week 
Textbook: Apologia Exploring Creation with General Science 

  • Physical Science  

This introductory middle school physical science course employs a mastery-oriented approach, laying a strong foundation for future high school science courses. This class will help students explore the physical world, and learn the basic laws of physics and chemistry in a very organized way. Topics covered are energy, order and design in nature, forces and fields, substances, properties of substances, science theories and truth, measurement and units, force and motion, compounds and chemical reactions, waves, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, and electromagnetism.
Class meets: tbd
 
Home study cxpectations: 3-4 hours per week 
Textbook: Novare Physical Science 

Ninth grade students may also consider Biology and Geometry from the Electives for High School Courses page.

  • Foundational Drawing 

Class meets: Monday 

  •  Intro to Acting and Shakespeare

Do you like to act, or think you would like to give it a try?  There is nothing like being in a play!  In a supportive and fun atmosphere you will develop your repertoire of acting skills, and become part of a theatre ensemble with your fellow classmates. We will dive into the amazing language of William Shakespeare, the world’s most famous playwright, with all kinds of theatre games and rehearsal techniques direct from the Royal Shakespeare Company in England.  Our exploration of Shakespeare will include speeches and scenes from several of his best-known works - Much Ado About Nothing, Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, and The Tempest – and then we’ll work together to put on our own shortened performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.  “The play’s the thing!”
Class meets: Wednesday

  • ECA Junior High School Choir

This course explores a wide range of choral music in varying degrees of difficulty. Students may expect fun and excellence as they perfect and perform Sacred, Pop, Musical Theater, Classical, and Modern repertoire. Basic Music Theory and early Music History are also introduced, and students can expect 30-60 minutes of homework in preparation for class each week. Performance opportunities include ECA seasonal concerts, local choir festivals, All-State Choir (by audition only), and the Colorado University at Pueblo High School Honor Choir Festival (by audition only).

Class meets: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
Materials: Black 1-inch 3-ring binder, pencils, notebook paper
Audition: Not required
Home study expectations: 30-60 minutes per week


Study Hall:
  
Remember to sign up for study hall for any break between classes.   

2017-18 Dialectic 1 Schedule G5/D1

2017-18 Dialectic 2 Schedule D2